“Mom, Dad, my arm hurts.”  This is a statement you never want to hear as the parent of a throwing athlete, especially with headlines about Tommy John surgeries dominating the Major League Baseball world.  As children begin to specialize in sports at earlier ages, we need to be aware of the dangers that are associated with it.  Throwing athletes, baseball pitchers specifically, risk injuries to the shoulder and elbow with this early specialization as adolescents, teenagers, and young adults begin throwing younger, pitch more innings, and have higher velocities.  Parents have a responsibility to understand these issues as prevention is the main factor to maintain the arm health of their children.
“Maintaining a Healthy Throwing Arm”

  

(Evansville, IN)  St. Vincent Evansville and Tri-State Orthopaedics broke ground on St. Vincent Orthopedic Hospital today. The $95 million, 135,000-square-foot, four-story St. Vincent Orthopedic Hospital will be located at the northeast corner of Warrick Wellness Trail and Epworth Road, making it a natural extension of the St. Vincent Epworth Crossing campus, which provides a variety of outpatient services such as:
“St. Vincent and Tri-State Orthopaedics Break Ground on St. Vincent Orthopedic Hospital”

Spinal deformity is the presence of an abnormal curvature of the spine. This may present as either an “S” shaped curve noticeable from behind the patient or a “C” shaped curvature noticeable from the side of the patient, sometimes referred to as a “roundback” deformity or “hump.”

Scoliosis

Scoliosis is the S-Shaped curvature seen from a person’s back. It is sometimes associated with a tilted shoulder or prominent shoulder blade or rib hump. It is most commonly seen in adolescent females, around the pubertal growth spurt (age 10-14). The problem is that the condition is usually painless in its early phase and is not visibly detectable, so it eludes diagnosis. That is why it must be screened at either school, the pediatrician’s, or family doctor’s office. If undetected, the spinal curvature may progress to surgical proportions, disallowing any other treatment options.


“Spinal Deformity: Young and Not-So-Young”