Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R) physicians are medical doctors who have completed training in the specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation. They are also known as physiatrists. They treat a wide variety of medical conditions affecting the nerves, bones, joints, muscles, ligaments and tendons. Some physiatrists complete advanced fellowship training for subspecialty certification.  Dr Wetzel has completed a pain fellowship and has extensive training in image guided injections.

PM&R physicians treat patients of a variety of ages, and focus on improving function. They have a broad medical expertise that allows them to treat disabling conditions throughout a persons lifetime. They can help determine and lead a treatment/prevention plan. They work with physical therapist and occupational therapist to optimize patient care.

PM&R physicians have completed four years of medical school, followed by four additional years of PM&R residency. Fellowship training is additional time there after.

PM&R is often called the quality of life profession, because it’s aim is to enhance patient performance. There is a holistic focus not on one part of the body, but instead on the development of a comprehensive program for putting the pieces of a person’s life back together after injury or disease.

The specialty developed in the 1930s to address musculoskeletal and neurological problems. The field broadened its scope considerably after World War II. As thousands of veterans came back to the US with serious disabilities, the task of helping to restore them to productive lives became a new direction for the field. Today the ABPMR ensures high quality training, testing for board certification and maintaining certification through lifelong learning.

For more information visit the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilation website –    https://www.aapmr.org/about-physiatry/about-physical-medicine-rehabilitation

For an appointment with one of our PM&R physicians, schedule online or call 812-477-1558.

Pay My Bill Online

by Monica Auker - Posted on Jan 7, 2020

As a patient of Tri-State Orthopaedics, you can pay your bill online at Make a Payment with your account number and date of birth. When on the Tri-State homepage, click on “Patient Info” and go to “Make a Payment”. If you have issues or need assistance accessing Online Payment, please contact our billing company: 812-492-4867 or Toll Free: 866-876-8702.

Thank you for choosing Tri-State Orthopaedics!

 

Total Joint Trek 2019

by Colin Johns - Posted on Aug 2, 2019

Join us for the 3rd annual Total Joint Trek at the Ascension St. Vincent Orthopedic Hospital! This event was established to promote well-being and inspire individuals with joint replacements to lead active, healthy lifestyles. Total Joint Trek is a great way to get out and support others who have common background while working towards improving yourself!

For more information visit our website : www.totaljointtrek.com
Sign up for the event online: https://forms.gle/V2sp7nxfLopkatKF8

What is a separated shoulder?

Separated shoulder, also known as AC joint separation occurs from a direct fall on or blow to the shoulder. This injury accounts for 9%-12% of shoulder injuries. Continue reading to learn more about recognizing and treating AC joint separation.

Understanding the anatomy

Three bones form the shoulder joint: the humerus (upper arm bone), the scapula (shoulder blade), and the clavicle (collarbone).  The AC joint, short for acromioclavicular joint, is where the clavicle meets the highest portion of the scapula, the acromion, and is held together by the acromioclavicular (AC) ligament and coracoclavicular (CC) ligament.

Who gets AC joint separation?

This most often occurs in men in their 20’s who participate in contact sports like football, hockey, and wrestling.  However, it can occur in anyone with a traumatic injury to the shoulder.


“Shoulder Separation (AC Joint Separation)”

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

by Dr. Glenn Johnson - Posted on Apr 24, 2019

What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Picture this – you wake up in the middle of the night to a painful numbness or tingling in your hand. At first you think your hand is just asleep but this sensation doesn’t go away. If this is something you have experienced, you might be dealing with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a condition that affects the nerve of your wrist. This can cause pain, numbness, and tingling in your hand. This condition affects the thumb, pointer, middle, and part of the ring finger.

Cause

The cause of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is inflammation of the nerve at the wrist. The inflammation causes swelling of the nerve in a confined space which results in increased pressure on the nerve. This pressure causes the nerve dysfunction. Nerve dysfunction leads to the numbness and tingling sensation that people experience. There is no single cause that leads to Carpal Tunnel. However, one of the most common causes is repetitive movement.


“Carpal Tunnel Syndrome”